The Movement is Never-ending – The Inspiration of John Lewis’s MARCH

marchtrilogy

MARCH volumes 1-3, published by Top Shelf Comics.

I knew this would be a powerful book before I started reading it, but I was both surprised and thankful that it stirred me as much as it did. John Lewis’s sensational, three-volume comic March, co-written by Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, does more than simply recount landmark moments in the Civil Rights movement–many of which are firmly rooted in the history books of America–it brings the reader into those moments. It takes you behind the radio bulletins, television broadcasts and political rallies and shows you so much more of what was going on during that era.

To consider that the 15th amendment had been in place for almost a century and was still being ignored by both state and federal governments fills me with ire. I couldn’t help but feel shame, reading about the Continue reading

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Fables & Fond Memories – A Fairytale Ode to One of the Finest Comic Book Series

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Snow White and Bigby, the Big Bad Wolf, two of the series mainstays. Along with a coterie of supporting Fables in the background.

I read my first Fables comic when I was 20 years old. Actually, it would be more accurate to say I read my first 30 Fables comics.

I started off with #1 on a chilly Atlantic Canadian winter weekend, as I was home visiting from university during my fourth and final year, and I didn’t end up leaving my chair until I had finished the March of the Wooden Soldiers arc, effectively reading every Fables comic that had been published to date. I couldn’t believe what I had just read. Or at least, I couldn’t believe the feeling I got from what I just read. I can’t recall my first experience with a Disney film, but it’s safe to say that Fables gave me that same sense of magical elation, only more… adult. Continue reading

Making Passion, Making Life – A Review of Scott McCloud’s The Sculptor

Scott McCloud's The Sculptor

Simply incredible.

Whenever a book moves me so thoroughly that it becomes an instant favourite the moment I close the back cover, I am compelled to sit down and write a review to sing its praises. With the Sculptor, I’d initially just sat here speechless, absorbing how remarkable of a read-in-a-single-sitting book it is. But now I know how to explain how positively it affected me. Continue reading

From My Childhood & Me, Thank You Darwyn Cooke

New Frontier This is not a review of DC: The New Frontier, not really; it’s a Thank You letter to Darwyn Cooke. Since I want to expand on this and say just how much Cooke’s New Frontier has meant to me, itself a perfect love letter to the medium of comics, I need to go back to the beginning.

When I was growing up my mother kept an evolving journal about my school days, updating it every year with highlights or accomplishments from each new grade. Stuff like “Started Playing Hockey” in Kindergarten, or “Went on First Skiing Trip” in Grade 6 would pop up alongside more menial notes like my new height or weight.

Spoiler alert! Batman needs a chiropractor.

Spoiler alert! Batman needs a chiropractor.

When I was in Grade 1, aged six, one of the new entries read: “Started Collecting Marvel Comics”. My heroes were Peter Parker, the Amazing Spider-Man and Charles Xavier’s Uncanny X-Men. Continue reading

What Horatio Saw

Happy World Poetry Day 2016!

I decided to write a poem in homage to the bard himself.

What Horatio Saw

I hear it crawling in the distance–
fog so dense, my throat gets wet.
I join my friends upon the battlement
to see the unseen they’ve twice met.

They beseech me, Bernardo and Marcellus,
to join them in these dark minutes,
to accept waking beliefs they’ve stretched–
pushing their reason to its limits.

It was just a cloud mixed with a shadow,
surely, could not have been more than that– Continue reading

Guns, Grit & A Guffawing Good Time: A Review of The Sisters Brothers

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There are rare literary lottery moments when there comes a book so captivating, so entertaining, so utterly can’t-put-done worthy that I not only want to shout about it from the rooftops, but feel compelled to. Even before I finished trekking my eyes from cover to cover, delighted by following the adventures and misadventures of Eli and Charlie, I thought:  “It is now my sworn duty to tell others about this fantastic piece of literature.” The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt is that book. Continue reading